Jamaican creole vs standard english

A Handbook for Teachers', be used to guide students in understanding Creole and English. Esther Tyson, Contributor By every child in our country will have the best learning environment. Each person will leave school at the secondary level with at least five CXC subjects including English, mathematics and a foreign language gradesand will have a working skill.

Jamaican creole vs standard english

Since the midth century, Jamaica has increasingly developed stronger social and economic ties with the United States and the increasing popularity of U. Therefore, Jamaicans follow the British grammar, and British English is taught in school.

Vocabulary[ edit ] Recent American influence is apparent in the lexicon babies sleep in "cribs" and wear "diapers" or "pampers"; some people live in "apartments" or "townhouses", for example. Generally, older vocabulary tends to be British babies wear "nappies", not "diapers"; cars have "bonnets" and "windscreens"; children study "maths", use "rubbers" to erase their mistakes and wish they were on "holiday"while newer phenomena are typically "imported" together with their American names.

The American term "trunk" is almost universally used instead of the British term "boot" on cars, while the engine covering is always referred to by the British term "bonnet" as elsewhere throughout the English-official Caribbean.

This is probably because the American term, "hood", is used in Jamaica as a vulgar slang for penis but not elsewhere in the Caribbean. Pronunciation[ edit ] Jamaican Standard English pronunciation, while it differs greatly from Jamaican Patois pronunciation, is nevertheless recognizably Caribbean.

Merger of the diphthongs in "fair" and "fear" takes place both in Jamaican Standard English and Jamaican Patoisresulting in those two words and many others, like "bear" and "beer" often becoming homophones: Jamaican Patois has began to be used on the radio as well as the news.

Most Creole-dominant speakers have a fair command of English and Standard English, through schooling and exposure to official culture and mass media; their receptive skills understanding of Standard English are typically much better than their productive skills their own intended Standard English statements often show signs of Jamaican Creole interference.

Most writing in Jamaica is done in English including private notes and correspondence. Jamaican Patois has a standardized orthography, [17] and has only recently been taught in some schools.

As a result, the majority of Jamaicans can read and write Standard English only, and have trouble deciphering written Patois in which the writer tries to reflect characteristic structures and pronunciations to differing degrees, without compromising readability.

Written Patois appears mostly in literatureespecially in folkloristic "dialect poems"; in humoristic newspaper columns; and most recently, on internet chat sites frequented by younger Jamaicans, who seem to have a more positive attitude toward their own language use than their parents.

This situation typically results when a Creole language is in constant contact with Standardised English superstrate or lexifier language and is called a creole speech continuum.

Jamaican creole vs standard english

The least prestigious most Creole variety is called the basilect ; Standard English or high prestige variety, the acrolect ; and in-between versions are known as mesolects. Consider, for example, the following forms: Jamaicans choose from the varieties available to them according to the situation.

A Creole-dominant speaker will choose a higher variety for formal occasions like official business or a wedding speech, and a lower one for relating to friends; a Standard English-dominant speaker is likely to employ a lower variety when shopping at the market than at their workplace.

Code-switching can also be metacommunicative as when a Standard-dominant speaker switches to a more heavily basilect-influenced variety in an attempt at humor or to express solidarity.TASK 1b - Paludi Annarita - LS II ANNO - a.a.

/ Formal Description of the verbal repertory. Jamaican Patois is what linguists call Jamaican Creole while "Patois" or Patwa is a French term referring to regional languages of France, Jamaican Standard English is grammatically similar to British Standard English. TASK 1b - Paludi Annarita - LS II ANNO - a.a.

/ Formal Description of the verbal repertory. Jamaican Patois is what linguists call Jamaican Creole while "Patois" or Patwa is a French term referring to regional languages of France, Jamaican Standard English is grammatically similar to British Standard English. Jamaican Standard English is the acrolect.

It is basically a mutually intelligible dialect of English. Jamaican Patois on the other hand is a creole that is the basilect. It is not mutually intelligible, or at least not very mutually intelligible.

Nov 02,  · But, more and more, it seems, the creole is the preferred form of speech for many Jamaicans and there are children coming from homes and communities where very little (if any) Standard English is spoken.

This concern relates to the decreasing thrust to teach Standard Jamaican English (SJE) at our tertiary institutions and rather to focus on the use of Jamaican Creole (JC) in the classrooms.

Students' Information: Jamaican Creole and Standard English Contrasted

It is generally acknowledged that the world is a global village. Plural Marking Plural marking in Standard English is a hodgepodge of different forms borrowed and assimilated from many languages.

The original Old English way of making plurals was either the addition of -n or -en or the changing of the vowel sound, as it is for Modern German.

Jamaican English or Jamaican Standard English is a dialect of E